5


Day 5: The green explosion
September 26, 2010, 7:14 pm
Filed under: 2/5, Art, Design, Food, Making of | Tags: , , , ,

Yes! I did a beautiful autumn walk to school and what expects me there – the green explosion I was hoping for! :) Just got done with preparing the edibles for tomorrow night. Smells good here… Tomorrow will be the last day of the installation, ending in the small experimental dinner with signed-up people, and the dismantling of the exhibition afterwards/meanwhile.

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day 3: first green/ sign-up for the ‘dinner’!
September 24, 2010, 1:41 pm
Filed under: 2/5, Art, Design | Tags: , , , , ,

After only 2 days, there is already some green to be seen! I am expecting a green explosion on Monday… (or at least, I am hoping for one).

Since the sign-up list for the Monday night experimental dinner is not accessible over the weekend (unless you are a workaholic Taik-student who works at school during weekends ;)), you can also sign up by sending me an email to: katharina.moebus@aalto.fi. So far, I had about 6/12 people on the list (which was around noon).  By Sunday, I will send closer information to those who wish to participate. Hope to see you!



sewn and sown
September 22, 2010, 2:03 pm
Filed under: 2/5, Art, Bread, Design | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Another day of change for the installation – today, I sew the four old bedsheets together to one big huge tablecloth, and sowed cress seeds on top of it. Now, watering time has started. The seeds start to sprout already after one or two days, so if you want to see the process, come check it out regularly. The growing process will also be documented regularly.

Last week, I have given out personal invitations to professors from the school for the final ‘harvest dinner’ (date: 27.09.2010, 4 pm), but it seems like most of them are too busy to attend. I will start to put up a  list for interested people who are either studying, working, or anyhow involved with Taik nex to the exhibition. First 12 people get in!



No garden, no balcony, no terrace? Start windowfarming!

Just came back from the Hub which is hosting a three-day-workshop about windowfarming, a vertical growing-system for growing greens in your own urban dwelling. The project was started by artists Britta Riley and Rebecca Bray in February, 2009 through an artist’s residency in New York. The idea came out of the simple will to grow own vegetables in Britta’s Brooklyn flat, which does not, like most urban housing, have access to dirt. Since then, it has found an incredible fast-growing worldwide acclaim. The internet and social media has allowed the project to be developped further by all sorts of people with different backgrounds around the globe, building the system themselves and sharing their experiences on the open source community blog of the project, http://our.windowfarms.org/. And here the link to the “official” website of the project.

Detail of a bottle with some beautiful greens

Windowfarms installation in New York

The system has also been installed in Finland in a bigger scale (81 bottles) during the Pixelache festival 2010 by Mikko Laajola, Andrew Paterson and Niko Punin with the help of many volunteers in Helsinki’s contemporary art museum Kiasma. One third of the materials went to the Hub Helsinki, so that the windowfarming could be continued in a semi-public location in the city.

Here is a link to the Facebook-event, taking place tomorrow and the day after (24./24.08.2010, starting from 6 pm-8 pm). It is not too late to participate yet! Tomorrow, the planning and material retrievement will be discussed and adjusted to Finnish conditions, and on Wednesday, we will build a windowfarm to the Hub! This project is a beautiful example of how open source, collaboration, participatory design, social media, and a simple and great idea can make the world a better place.

I am really thrilled about this, since I am famous for my rather black thumb, but still always wanted to grow something at home. Never really had the possibility because of the lack of a garden or a balcony. In Finnish conditions, this system even gives the possibility to grow food all year through, and, by adding a light system like the Kiasma-crew did, even throughout the dark Finnish winter. Anxious to learn more by trying it out!